Medical coding and billing training in Wisconsin are growing in demand every year and the next decade looks real bright for the career! The allied heath job is popular with people at the beginning of their careers in healthcare because it requires comparatively little education. See what the expected growth is how to get started towards certification.

Becoming a medical biller or coder in Wisconsin

Medical billers and coders are not required by law to hold a certification in order to work in Wisconsin. As is the case with all states in the United States, the medical billing and coding profession in Wisconsin is regulated on a national level by the bodies listed below.

Certifications for billing and coding are recognized from several different national bodies. Employers in the state recognize a wide range of certifications from the American Academy of Professional Coders (AAPC), National Healthcare Association (NHA), American Health Information Management Association (AHIMA), and the Medical Association of Billers (MAB).

What is the process for becoming a certified biller or coder in Wisconsin?

The easy process to become a medical biller or coder in Wisconsin is displayed below.

Step 1 – Decide if you plan to get certified

Before anything else, you’re going to first want to figure out if you’re planning to get a certification, or look for a position without one. This decision is extremely important as it’s going to have a huge impact on not just how long it requires for you to begin your career, but also the kinds of positions you can apply for.

Although there is going to be a commitment of time and money needed in order to become certified, the benefits that doing so provides are substantial. On top of that, most facilities now require that their medical billing and coding specialists get certified in an effort to help protect their practices against escalating insurance costs and lawsuits.

The move toward compulsory certification has even started to impact non-certified employees who have worked for many years. As a requirement of continued employment, non-certified team members are often being required by their employers to get a certification.

Should you still decide not to get your certification, then the next move is to begin applying for employment opportunities for non-certified medical coding and billing specialists. But then again, if you opt to get your certification, you should advance to the next step below.

Step 2 – Complete a formal training program

The second decision you will need to make is whether you want to earn a an associate degree, four-year bachelor’s degree, or a certificate (called a “diploma” by some courses). Either kind of credential is recognized by the majority of employers, but you need to be cognizant of the advantages and drawbacks of each one.

Diplomas and Certificates

Certificate or diploma programs can oftentimes be finished in 12 months or less, and focus their course of study solely on the skill and knowledge needed to begin your career. A wide array of institutions offer these popular training programs, and a lot of them are offered in an online format too. This is unlike associate and bachelor’s degree programs which include general education and many other university classes as well.

Associate Degree

Associate degree courses are normally two years in length, and the information discussed is much more comprehensive in scope. Admission prerequisites and tuition for these programs are more substantial because they tend to be available at either junior colleges or trade schools.

Holding an associate degree can provide many benefits that one wouldn’t have with just a certificate or diploma, though.

Bachelor’s Degree

For students who wish to obtain the strongest comprehension of coding and billing, while also pursuing a nicely balanced college education, bachelor’s degree programs are typically the ideal choice. These kinds of programs are provided by vocational schools and standard four-year schools, so admissions standards and tuition costs are usually greater.

Carrying a bachelor’s degree is usually seen by businesses as a huge asset, and one can usually anticipate higher wages and responsibilities as a result.

Either of these options is a viable way to start your professional career, as long as it meets your personal aspirations and financial circumstances. For those concerned with the cost and time required to get an associate or bachelor’s degree, the diploma approach is likely the right alternative. A lot of medical billing and coding specialists elect to go back to school later and earn a degree after starting off with a diploma, so keep this option in mind as well.

If you are planning on advancing quickly in your professional medical career, and have a greater objective on your mind, then the extra money and time necessary to get a degree can make sense for you.

How to pick a medical billing and coding program in Wisconsin

The organizations responsible for regulating medical billing and coding courses in Wisconsin include the Commission of Accreditation for Health Informatics and Information Management Education (CAHIIM) and the American Academy of Professional Coders (AAPC). Only graduates who complete their schooling at a program accredited by one of these bodies are allowed to test for certification. Go ahead and click on the links provided to look through their databases of programs in your area.

Finding the best course for your particular circumstances usually requires some considerations. You should think about the following when comparing classes:

  • Specifically take courses accredited by CAHIIM or AAPC
  • Try and get the percentage of graduates that previously passed their certification exam
  • Make sure that all of your studies and classes fit into your personal schedule
  • Make sure your overall cost aligns with your budget

We all have different goals that impact the choices we make. In the event that the cost of tuition is the most crucial factor for you, that should be the first thing you find out about every program. After that, move on to the second-most important thing (e.g. course schedules, etc.) and use that criteria to further narrow your options.

Repeat this method with every criteria that’s critical for you, and you will at some point have only a couple of programs to make a choice between. Ensuring that the course you go with fits your individual circumstances can significantly boost your chances of graduating.

Step 3 – Complete an internship or acquire work experience

We all have different goals that impact the choices we make. In the event that the cost of tuition is the most crucial factor for you, that should be the first thing you find out about every program. After that, move on to the second-most important thing (e.g. course schedules, etc.) and use that criteria to further narrow your options.

Repeat this method with every criteria that’s critical for you, and you will at some point have only a couple of programs to make a choice between. Ensuring that the course you go with fits your individual circumstances can significantly boost your chances of graduating.

Step 3 – Do an internship or get work experience

A requirement for the majority of coding and billing certification exams is that the student needs to have previously had job experience or completed a formal internship. To satisfy this prerequisite, you need to consider completing an internship or working in a non-certified role for a local business before the conclusion of your education program.

Local companies typically work together with accredited billing and coding schools to help setup internships or work experience for students. It’s recommended that you speak with your teacher to find out which opportunities are available to help you secure the experience needed to become eligible for certification assessment.

Certified Professional Coder (CPC) and Certified Professional Biller (CPB) from AAPC – Among the most-recognized, and most-highly regarded of the medical billing and coding certifications, the CPC and CPB certifications are provided by the American Academy of Professional Coders (AAPC).

Certified Billing and Coding Specialist (CBCS) from NHA – The NHA certification is respected by facilities throughout the country, and signifies that its owner holds a well-rounded set of medical billing and coding skills.

Certified Coding Associate (CCA) from AHIMA – The CCA certificate is a nationally-accepted credential that qualifies its holder for a broad array of positions in medical coding.

Insurance and Coding Specialist (NCICS) from NCCA – The NCICS grants a national credential for medical billing and coding specialists.

Certified Medical Billing Specialist (CMBS) and Certified Medical Records Technician (CMRT) from MAB – Ideally suited for those planning on focusing on billing positions, the CMBS and CMRT are national credentials that show advanced proficiencies in a range of billing-related competencies.

Medical coder and biller salary and jobs in Wisconsin

There’s a higher than average demand for medical coding and billing specialists across the United States and in Wisconsin. The Bureau of Labor Statistics expects a 15% growth in additional positions nationally and 8% in the State of Wisconsin through 2024. Popular workplaces are: general care facilities, hospitals and physicians offices. Several registry facilities also employ health information technicians.

The chance to become acquainted with EHRs (electronic health records) makes the medical billing and coding profession perfect for those planning on advancing into another job in the health information sector.

To check out income data for Wisconsin by region and county, feel free to take a look at the table below.

LocationPay TypeLowMedianHigh
United StatesHourly$12.05$18.29$30.21
Yearly$25,070$38,040$62,840
WisconsinHourly$13.18$18.46$29.02
Yearly$27,410$38,400$60,360
Minneapolis-St. Paul-Bloomington, MN-WI MSAHourly$15.93$21.87$29.43
Yearly$33,130$45,490$61,220
Duluth, MN-WI MSAHourly$15.29$21.40$29.16
Yearly$31,800$44,520$60,640
Milwaukee-Waukesha-West Allis, WI MSAHourly$13.98$21.14$30.50
Yearly$29,080$43,980$63,440
Madison, WI MSAHourly$15.11$20.10$29.10
Yearly$31,430$41,800$60,520
Lake County-Kenosha County, IL-WI Metropolitan DivisionHourly$13.41$19.24$32.34
Yearly$27,890$40,020$67,270
Oshkosh-Neenah, WI MSAHourly$14.67$19.24$26.03
Yearly$30,510$40,020$54,150
Eau Claire, WI MSAHourly$12.22$18.17$29.73
Yearly$25,420$37,790$61,840
Appleton, WI MSAHourly$12.90$18.07$27.10
Yearly$26,830$37,580$56,370
West Central Wisconsin BOSHourly$13.15$17.93$26.68
Yearly$27,340$37,290$55,490
Green Bay, WI MSAHourly$12.72$17.83$24.90
Yearly$26,470$37,080$51,790
Southwestern Wisconsin BOSHourly$12.81$17.32$25.30
Yearly$26,650$36,030$52,610
Wausau, WI MSAHourly$13.02$17.13$22.93
Yearly$27,080$35,640$47,700
Sheboygan, WI MSAHourly$12.58$16.72$23.56
Yearly$26,170$34,770$49,010
La Crosse, WI-MN MSAHourly$12.61$16.52$23.56
Yearly$26,220$34,360$49,000
Eastern Wisconsin BOSHourly$12.43$16.48$23.16
Yearly$25,850$34,270$48,160
Janesville, WI MSAHourly$12.70$16.21$21.44
Yearly$26,420$33,710$44,590
South Central Wisconsin BOSHourly$11.45$15.87$22.75
Yearly$23,810$33,010$47,310