If you choose to become a Home Health Aide (HHA) in North Carolina, you’ll be entering one of the fastest-growing health care careers in the country. A Home Health Aide is a general care provider that performs multiple support functions for clients in home care environments. {This is one of the reasons why Home Health Aides are} sought after entry-level jobs in healthcare because of the fact that no college education is required to be able to begin your career. Along with that, the certification and training prerequisites can in most situations be fulfilled within a few months.

In this article we cover all of the actions included in the process of making a decision and the current steps required in order to become a HHA.

How to Become a Home Health Aide in North Carolina

The Home Health Aide’s everyday responsibilities really concentrate on basic patient care and support. This typically entails keeping track of the patient’s medical condition and providing support and required assistance with routines like dressing, bathing and feeding. As we discussed about above, the Home Health Aide in North Carolina works pretty much on their own in home care environments. Some illustrations of tasks carried out by Home Health Aides can be viewed in this guide on how to become a HHA.

What’s the Process for Becoming a Home Health Aide in North Carolina?

In the section below we’ll take a more in-depth glance at the needed steps for becoming a Home Health Aide in the State of North Carolina.

Step 1 – Get your high school diploma or G.E.D.

The very first step towards whatever position you pursue should always be completing your high school diploma. This is also true when it comes to working in medicine and health. Even in cases when it’s feasible to gain a position without a high school diploma, the jobs often don’t offer much in the way of pay or opportunities for growth.

If shopping for a HHA certification program, you may find that most schools require trainees to hold a diploma or G.E.D. before registration. So, whatever your ultimate professional goals, be sure that you take this first step.

Step 2: Register for a state-approved HHA class

There are a couple of reasons to get professional instruction and become your certification. The greatest reason is that employers who receive Medicare or Medicaid from their customers have to use certified individuals in order to be eligible for the government assistance.

Step 3: Finish your HHA training course and any mandated hands-on training hours

Not surprisingly, passing your North Carolina accredited HHA classes if you want to be a Home Health Aide is an important and vital step. And it is! After passing your training, the North Carolina requires that an individual train for 75 classroom hours and 16 clinical hours before becoming qualified for taking the North Carolina Home Health Aide certification examination.

Step 4: Take and pass the North Carolina Home Health Aide certification examination

The exam is given in two parts, a written and a clinical part. The written component is to show your knowledge and assessment ability. The clinical component is to determine if you have the skills essential to do the job and find out what you have learned in your approved training. You will be given your certification within a couple weeks in most situations.

Outlook for HHA salary in North Carolina

There is a strong national demand for HHAs and in North Carolina with BLS.gov predicting a 41% increase in new jobs nationwide and 35% in North Carolina through the year 2026. Directly below is a deeper break down of Home Health Aide pay in North Carolina by area and county in North Carolina.

LocationPay TypeLowMedianHigh
United StatesHourly$8.65$10.87$14.72
Yearly$17,990$22,600$30,610
North CarolinaHourly$7.89$9.30$12.26
Yearly$16,410$19,350$25,500
Hickory-Lenoir-Morganton, NC MSAHourly$8.19$10.85$14.81
Yearly$17,030$22,570$30,800
Virginia Beach-Norfolk-Newport News, VA-NC MSAHourly$8.22$10.82$14.57
Yearly$17,100$22,500$30,310
Asheville, NC MSAHourly$8.10$10.59$14.92
Yearly$16,860$22,040$31,030
Raleigh-Cary, NC MSAHourly$8.30$10.56$13.12
Yearly$17,260$21,970$27,290
Wilmington, NC MSAHourly$8.22$10.39$12.42
Yearly$17,100$21,620$25,840
Durham-Chapel Hill, NC MSAHourly$7.96$9.84$12.96
Yearly$16,560$20,460$26,960
Western North Carolina BOSHourly$8.00$9.76$11.91
Yearly$16,640$20,290$24,770
Burlington, NC MSAHourly$7.98$9.72$11.77
Yearly$16,600$20,220$24,470
Greensboro-High Point, NC MSAHourly$7.92$9.32$12.02
Yearly$16,480$19,390$25,010
Myrtle Beach-Conway-North Myrtle Beach, SC-NCHourly$7.91$9.23$11.95
Yearly$16,450$19,190$24,850
Winston-Salem, NC MSAHourly$7.86$9.17$13.63
Yearly$16,360$19,080$28,360
Greenville, NC MSAHourly$7.87$9.12$11.83
Yearly$16,370$18,970$24,610
Western Central North Carolina BOSHourly$7.86$9.10$11.77
Yearly$16,350$18,920$24,470
Charlotte-Gastonia-Rock Hill, NC-SC MSAHourly$7.83$9.09$11.77
Yearly$16,290$18,900$24,480
Goldsboro, NC MSAHourly$7.83$9.09$16.65
Yearly$16,290$18,910$34,620
Jacksonville, NC MSAHourly$7.84$9.01$11.66
Yearly$16,310$18,730$24,260
Northeastern North Carolina BOSHourly$7.81$9.01$11.59
Yearly$16,240$18,730$24,100
Fayetteville, NC MSAHourly$7.82$8.94$11.18
Yearly$16,270$18,590$23,260
Other North Carolina BOSHourly$7.76$8.72$10.40
Yearly$16,140$18,140$21,630
Rocky Mount, NC MSAHourly$7.67$8.65$10.90
Yearly$15,950$18,000$22,670