If you are looking in to how to become an EMT in South Carolina, use our free resources to get started on the right path! All emergency medical technicians are regulated by the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control and we show you what you need to do to get certified.

What do SC Emergency Medical Technicians do?

As mentioned previously, EMTs and Paramedics treat the sick or injured in urgent medical situations. Here is a detailed look at a number of EMT job responsibilities.

How to become an Emergency Medical Technician in South Carolina

If you would like to become an EMT or Paramedic in South Carolina, you’re going to be asked to graduate from a professional training program. South Carolina requires that all EMTs and Paramedics employed in the state be professionally licensed. While every state could have different requirements for EMT certification, the five steps below are fairly standard.

Step 1: Complete high school or get your G.E.D.

Furthermore, all Emergency Medical Technician programs require students to be high school graduates or hold a G.E.D. in their admissions prerequisites. Put in the time to take this first step, and you will prevent a tremendous number of road blocks over your career.

Step 2: Graduate from an EMT training program in South Carolina

You have to finish an accredited, state-authorized Emergency Medical Technician (EMT) training program. Candidates must have finished the course in the past two years and present verification of successful program finalization on the National Registry website (details below). Community colleges, trade schools, hospitals and universities all offer Emergency Medical Technician training classes. You can also find them at fire and police training academies.

Approved EMT Training in South Carolina

All EMT courses are regulated and approved by the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control. Below are all the approved training program listed with the instructor’s name.

Tri-County Technical College Sheila M. Kaiser,

Midlands EMS Management Association Cynthia Diana Plant, Crystal Campbell Youmans

Midlands Technical College Mary M Allison,

Trident Technical College – Con Ed Matthew Frank Marous

Technical College of the Lowcountry James C. Long,

Technical College of the Lowcountry Delmer Hollingsworth,

Horry-Georgetown Technical College – AD Lynda S. Carter

Upstate Regional EMS Council Meredith L. Settle

Greenville Technical College – AD Michael David Cooper,

Horry-Georgetown Technical College – AD John Martin Miller

Greenville Health System Clinical University Harry Dean Douglas, Charles Phillip Head, III

Midlands Technical College Tony L. Wingard

Lowcountry Regional EMS Vickie L Griffin, William Justin Wolfe

Lowcountry Regional EMS Vickie L Griffin, William Justin Wolfe

Aiken Technical College – AD Terri Lyn Talley

Lowcountry Regional EMS David Wilson Pendarvis, III

Pee Dee Regional EMS Gary W. White

Upstate Regional EMS Council Linda Lee Holbrook

Spartanburg Community College – AD Douglas A Paris

Trident Technical College – Con Ed Wendy Renee Lee

Greenville Health System Clinical University John David Watson

Pee Dee Regional EMS David Lucas Hodge

Upstate Regional EMS Council Christopher Robert Ludbrook,

Trident Technical College – Con Ed Buford Lynn Bost, III

Midlands Technical College David Martin Chudd

Horry-Georgetown Technical College – AD John Martin Miller

York Technical College – Con Ed Andrew Robert Ross

York Technical College – Con Ed Richard F. Mann, Captain. John Russell Myers

York Technical College – Con Ed Richard F. Mann, Captain. John Russell Myers

Aiken Technical College – AD Christine O. Osbon

Coastal Advanced Pre Hospital Training & Education Captain. Steven Anthony Sampollo,

Greenville Health System Clinical University Harry Dean Douglas,

Midlands EMS Management Association Cynthia Diana Plant,

Upstate Regional EMS Council Linda Lee Holbrook

Horry-Georgetown Technical College – Con Ed Captain. Martin J. Eells, Matthew Thomas Lincoln, Tamara Jill Yoder

Tri-County Technical College Lisa L. Hubbard

Tri-County Technical College Shawn E. McDine

Trident Technical College – Con Ed Chief. William Norval Barnes

Trident Technical College – AD Robert Jeffrey Boone

Lowcountry Regional EMS Vickie L Griffin, William Justin Wolfe

Aiken Technical College – AD Christine O. Osbon,

Central Carolina Technical College Johnnie L. Burriss

MUSC – Charleston Captain. Matthew Floyd Wilder

Midlands Technical College Thomas Brian Hood

How long is EMT School in SC?

Based upon the particular training program, EMT programs can usually be finished in between 2 and six months.

Step 3: Have a current CPR-BLS certificate for “Healthcare Provider” or equivalent

Along with finishing your EMT training course, you need to also become CPR-BLS certified before sitting for your certification test. The American Heart Association manages the guidelines for all Basic Life Support (BLS) and CPR programs. Courses are offered through a number of educators, most notably the American Red Cross.

Step 4: Pass the National Registry EMT Exam

The EMTs certification test consists of a basic knowledge portion (the Cognitive Exam) and a skill demonstration section (the Psychomotor Exam). The knowledge portion is usually completed online and the skills test is done on location and in-person. We address the two exam segments in depth below.

Click here for all the necessary details about the EMT exams.

Step 5: Have your name included on the National EMT Registry

The remaining step in becoming an EMT is having your name posted to the National Emergency Medical Technician Registry inside of 30 days of graduating from your coursework. So as to become listed, you’re going to be asked to pay an $80 fee. This final step allows you to be eligible for employment as an EMT.

How much do EMTs make in South Carolina?

The data table below highlights the salary and hourly wage information for EMTs in South Carolina. All data come from the bls.gov website.

LocationPay TypeLowMedianHigh
United StatesHourly$10.52$16.05$27.40
Yearly$21,880 $33,380 $56,990
South CarolinaHourly$10.21$15.01$23.38
Yearly$21,230 $31,230 $48,640
Myrtle Beach-North Myrtle Beach-Conway, SC MSAHourly$12.86$18.20$23.99
Yearly$26,740 $37,860 $49,910
Charlotte-Gastonia-Rock Hill, NC-SC MSAHourly$12.01$17.65$24.87
Yearly$24,990 $36,720 $51,720
Columbia, SC MSAHourly$10.37$15.37$23.88
Yearly$21,570 $31,960 $49,670
Augusta-Richmond County, GA-SC MSAHourly$12.01$14.79$24.61
Yearly$24,980 $30,760 $51,190
Florence, SC MSAHourly$9.83$14.73$22.87
Yearly$20,450 $30,640 $47,560
Greenville-Mauldin-Easley, SC MSAHourly$10.24$14.57$22.05
Yearly$21,290 $30,310 $45,870
Hilton Head Island-Bluffton-Beaufort, SC Metro AreaHourly$9.53$14.53$18.97
Yearly$19,830 $30,210 $39,450
Pee Dee South Carolina BOSHourly$9.96$14.38$21.33
Yearly$20,710 $29,910 $44,370
Low Country South Carolina BOSHourly$11.01$14.32$18.68
Yearly$22,900 $29,780 $38,860
Lower Savannah South Carolina BOSHourly$10.35$13.70$19.08
Yearly$21,520 $28,500 $39,690
Upper Savannah South Carolina BOSHourly$9.54$13.25$20.81
Yearly$19,850 $27,560 $43,280

The employment prospects for EMTs in South Carolina

Thanks to the population growing and the Baby Boomers hitting retirement age in such large numbers, the medical industry overall is enjoying record growth in South Carolina. The growth for EMTs and Paramedics in South Carolina is expected to be good as well, with the Bureau of Labor Statistics predicting a 17% rise in new positions throughout the state through 2026.